Art Exhibit: Wyoming’s Outlaw Trail > June 16 – July 30, 2016

EXHIBIT SHOWCASES IMAGES OF HISTORIC LANDSCAPES AND CELEBRATED OUTLAWS, LAWMEN AND CITIZENS OF OLD WYOMING AND THE BROWN’S PARK AREA (NEAR DIAMOND MOUNTAIN).WYOT exhibit pics 2 (2) (2)_Page_02

Thanks in part to a $5,000 grant awarded by the Wyoming Humanities Council, the Uintah County Library and Uintah County Heritage Museum is showing Wyoming’s Outlaw Trail traveling exhibit, a public display put together by Sweetwater County Historical Museum Exhibits Coordinator Dave Mead and author Mac Blewer. The exhibit features a selection of text and photos from the book of the same title by Blewer, an Images of America publication released by Arcadia Publishing in 2013. Although this exhibit focuses on the Wyoming section of the Outlaw Trail, several of the photographs will introduce you to many outlaws and early settlers of the Brown’s Park (Utah) area.

Photograph of museum display

Photo of a display for this exhibit showing the front cover of Mac Blewer’s book.

States Dr. Sharon Kahin, Executive Director of the Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum, “Few figures in American history have been as romanticized as the outlaws of the Old West. This exhibit attempts to explore the folklore, history and geography behind the characters that rode Wyoming’s Outlaw Trail and puts them into context in their place in time and in the landscape of our imagination.”

The exhibit focuses on the Outlaw Trail, an historic and folkloric path that meandered from Canada to Mexico and was used by Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, Kid Curry and other bandits. Highlighting the deeds of these same robbers as well as the lawmen and ordinary citizens who knew them, Wyoming’s Outlaw Trail displays historic and contemporary photos of “outlaw oases” along the trail such as the Red Desert and Hole in the Wall and WYOT exhibit pics 2 (3)_Page_04some of the adjacent communities that sheltered numerous “bad men.” Says Kahin “Fabled buried treasure, bandit hideouts and scenes of reputed robberies the length and breadth of Wyoming, the age of the horseback outlaw is still alive….”

When: Friday, June 16th through Saturday, July 30, 2016.

Where: In the down stairs conference room, Uintah County Library (204 E 100 N, Vernal, UT), and in Uintah County Heritage Museum art gallery which is just adjacent to the library (155 E Main).

Questions? Contact Michelle Fuller in the Uintah County Regional History Center, (435) 789-6275 or mfuller@uintah.utah.gov or Lana Fullbright in the Uintah County Heritage Museum, (435) 789-7399 or lfullbright@uintah.utah.gov

 

Outlaw Trail Journal Available Now

Outlaw Trail Journal Summer 2014 issue is now available! This issue explores the how local sheep farming fueled the early Uintah Basin economy. This issue also includes an article on Briant Stringham, a prominent Uintah Basin sheep farmer. Subscribe today!

Uintah County Regional History Center hours & contact information:

Monday-Friday 8:00 am. – 5:00 p.m
Saturday and evening by appointment

152 E. 100 N. Vernal, UT 84078

435-789-6276

 

The cover of the Summer 2014 issue of the Outlaw Trail Journal

Outlaw Trail Journal Available Now

Outlaw Trail Journal Winter 2012 Issue. Available Now! This issue explores the oil and gas patch, some of our favorite stories, and some great articles. Subscribe today!

Uintah County Regional History Center

155 East Main

789-6275

otj  WINTER 2012 cover ad701

New Book Available: Uinta Basin Healers

We are pleased to announce the publication of Uinta Basin Healers. The book is available at the Regional History Center. To order a copy please call (435)789-0091 ext 19. $30.00. Doris Karren Burton, Retired director of the Library’s Regional History Center, spent ten years researching and writing this book.

Please note: Uinta is spelled without the “h” when describing the geographic area (i.e. Uinta Basin). In political contexts the word is spelled with the “h” (Uintah County, Uintah School District). We don’t know why they started doing it that way…they just did.

Book Summary:

When settlers began to arrive in the Uinta Basin in 1873, licensed members of the medical profession were not available. People had to make-do with home remedies and folk wisdom. This book shares life sketches, memories, and discusses the contributions made to the communities of the Uinta Basin by medical practitioners.

Doris Karren Burton has a deep-rooted history in the history of Uintah County. She was born in the county, and her grandparents and great-grandparents were instrumental in the settlement of Vernal, Utah. Thirty years ago Mrs. Burton retired as director of the Uintah County Library to establish the Regional History Center. Today the center employs four full-time people and has vast collections of historical documents, books, photographs and more.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,650 other followers